Mission/History

 

 

Our Mission Statement:

Boulevard Flower Gardens at Ruffin Mill strives to educate, inspire and assist the community with their growing needs. We will provide robust and healthy plant material, exciting trends for home and garden, accurate horticulture advice and professional services to educate families toward gardening success.

Company History:

Our history is a typical American story of simple family beginnings. From bundles of newspaper wrapped pansies, to a roadside produce stand and fresh cut Christmas trees, to cut flowers for a wedding, houseplants, bedding plants grown from seed and a few sleepy cats, Maybelle & George Landa began in 1955 to create a Route 1/301 landmark in Colonial Heights, VA.

With son Mark & his wife, Francine, taking the reins in 1982, the business diversified with increased perennials and the addition of nursery stock and landscaping. In 1986, a farm site was purchased for production and pick your own crops. Water gardening and a full service florist were added in the 1990’s. Quickly outgrowing “the Boulevard” location, the retail business moved to the farm site in February 2007, just 4 miles north in Chesterfield County. Six acres were designated for a state-of-the-art facility with indoor climate controlled by a weather station computer. The A-frame roof opens and shade cloths pull across the ceiling as determined by pre-set temperature controls. Guests and plants remain comfortable within the 33,000 sq ft greenhouse for shopping pleasure.

Boulevard Flower Gardens is located in what used to be known as Port Walthall. Port Walthall was part of 1600 acres patented by William Walthall in July 1656 “Lying and being in the county of Henrico, on the north side of Appomatuck River.” In the period before the American Civil War, Port Walthall was a major shipping and passenger embarkation location, and was served by a railroad. During the War, the railroad tracks leading to the port were melted down to manufacture Confederate cannons. The point where the tracks joined the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad some distance to the west was known as Port Walthall Junction. The Battle of Port Walthall Junction was fought on May 6–7, 1864, between Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. Though initially successful, the Confederates were eventually defeated, allowing Union forces to cut the railroad, one of Richmond’s vital supply lines. After the War, the railroad branch to Port Walthall was never restored. In modern times, the area is still recognized as Walthall, within South Chesterfield County at exit 58 off  I- 95, known as VA state route 58.